California Phenology Project Workshop

Date: Sunday, April 29, 2018

Time: 11:00AM - 3:00PM

Instructor: Dr. Susan Mazer

Location: Blaksley Library

Spaces still avalable.  Please register at the class

Free

A California Phenology Project Workshop and Field Training

The California Phenology Project (CPP) is a major partner in a nationwide effort (the USA-National Phenology Network) to track changes in the timing of seasonal life cycles in response to year-to-year changes in climate. This workshop will provide you with all the training you need to contribute valuable and high-quality data to this unique scientific effort.

This workshop will provide you with all the training you need to contribute valuable and high-quality data to this unique scientific effort.

Join us for this workshop and learn the answers to the following questions: What species are we monitoring in California? How does climate affect their leafing, flowering, and fruiting? Which species are most sensitive to climatic conditions?

The workshop will break for lunch from 12:45-1:30pm

Participants should bring:

  • Picnic lunch
  • Clipboard and pen or pencil.
  • Hand lens. If you don’t have a hand lens but do have a pair of binoculars, please bring them.
  • Please bring a mug for drinking tea.
  • Optional: laptop, ipad (or equivalent), or smart phone.

images of flowers and people

What is CPP?

The California Phenology Project and the USA-NPN are tracking the effects of climate change on the seasonal cycles of wild plant species (learn more at www.usanpn.org). Phenology is the study of the timing of seasonal plant and animal life cycle events, such as the flowering and fruiting dates of plants and the hatching date of fledging of birds. In order to detect the causes and consequences of variation in plant and animal phenology, scientists require large quantities of data, across large geographic areas, and we rely on citizen scientists to help create the largest, highest-quality data set possible. To achieve this goal, the CPP invites and trains residents across California to observe and to record key phenological events in ecologically important plants, and to upload these observations into an on-line database. Since 2011, citizen scientists, educators, and national park staff have contributed over 1,500,000 observations to the CPP, and we now see that many of our monitored plant species are highly sensitive to climate. This workshop will provide you with all the training you need to contribute valuable and high-quality data to this unique scientific research effort.

The CPP was initiated in seven National Parks: Joshua Tree, Santa Monica Mountains, Golden Gate, John Muir Historic Monument, Redwood National Park, Sequoia and Kings Canyon, and Lassen Volcanic National Park, but many participants provide high-quality data from hiking trails, other state and national parks, botanic gardens, their back yard or school yard, and other wild lands. Volunteers assist by monitoring plants using the standardized methods developed by the USA-National Phenology Network and used across the US, allowing observations in California to be compared to those collected elsewhere.

Instructor

Image of Susan MazerDr. Susan Mazer has been a professor of plant ecology, genetics, and evolution at UCSB since 1988. Her research aims to detect the processes and outcome of evolution by natural selection, particularly for plant life history and reproductive traits that contribute to the adaptation of plants to stressful environments, such as gas exchange rates, water use efficiency, seed size, age at flowering, flower size, and pollen and ovule production. She has worked with a wide variety of species and plant communities to detect reproductive and physiological adaptations, ranging from South American tropical rainforests to the Sierra Nevada and Coastal Ranges of California. Her current research is investigating the factors that influence the evolution of mating system (self-fertilization vs. outcrossing), physiological performance, age at flowering, flowering phenology, and drought-avoidance in the California native wildflower genus, Clarkia (Farewell to Spring), and in Nemophila menziesii (Baby Blue Eyes).

Dr. Susan Mazer, Director, The California Phenology Project and Professor of Plant Ecology & Evolution, UCSB

Category: 
Botany/Natural History
Conservation/Restoration
Free
Volunteer